Anyone who has lived in a Queenslander house will tell you they have character and each one is an individual. Each has its own variation – a window sill that’s not quite straight; the enchanting shadow cast by sunlight streaming through timber fretwork; a little slit at the bottom of a skirting board that lets in a bracing winter wind; a wide veranda that shades your family from the summer blaze and welcomes the warming winter sun. The Queenslander house is unique, a design icon, a building that says much about its origins. Associate Professor Peter Skinner, Queensland President of the Australian Institute of Architects, points out that the Queenslander was designed to work within its unique environment. “The lifestyle in the Queenslander house was different to that of Britain, Europe and southern Australian states,” he says. “We lived with the doors and windows open. We relaxed, entertained and chatted to the neighbours on the street from the veranda.” When one hears the word Queenslander, in relation to a building, a clear vision usually emerges: a timber house with a steep-pitched tin roof, surrounded or at the very least punctuated by a wide verandah, high-set on stumps with decorative timber ...